Deanna and Justin In The Morning

5:30am - 10:00am

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

In light of all the recent news surrounding young athletes having medical emergencies, WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR.

We thought it was best as a team, to have as many people as possible in the office who could react in an emergency situation.

Administering CPR can be scary, especially if you’re not quite sure what you’re doing.

So many things have changed over the years and we want to stay on top of the latest info.

We all saw what happened to Damar Hamlin when he collapsed on the football field during a game.

Following head on impact, he went into sudden cardiac arrest.

Hamlin was saved because someone administered CPR right away.

Did you know that it could take 15 minutes of CPR sometimes to save a life?

The most important thing to do in situations where it could be cardiac arrest or a heart attack, is to keep blood circulating.

This can manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken.

David Morris from the American Heart Association of Delaware, came in to teach us how to perform CPR.

We learned a lot about the process and myths surrounding it.

Mouth to Mouth is an outdated element of CPR. It is no longer required.

The necessary steps to be able to step in, in the event of an emergency are quite simple:

  • Get the victim/patient to a safe area and hard surface
  • Call 911 or have someone else call/ send someone to find a AED
  • Check to see if they are conscious
  • Start CPR and follow the 911 dispatcher’s instructions. push hard and fast (100 bpm)

Many training classes have mentioned singing the BeeGee’s “stayin’ Alive” because the song is the same beats per minute that you need to push.

Common myths include “I can get in trouble or even sued for touching someone” or “What I break a rib? Can I be liable?”

The answer to these myths is: they are both incorrect. The Good Samaritan law protects you from stepping in during an emergency. Also, while performing CPR you must push hard enough to keep blood pumping so it is likely a rib may fracture which is absolutely ok, and better than the alternative.

According to the AHA website, CPR can be turning point in someone surviving cardiac arrest.

In a cardiac arrest, every second counts. A cardiac arrest can happen anywhere, often while at home, at work or at play. And the victim is likely to be someone you know and love. Every minute CPR is delayed, a victim’s chance of survival decreases by 10%. Immediate CPR from someone nearby can double – even triple – their chance of survival.

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

WJBR Learns Hands Only CPR

 

11 Very Weird Laws from Around the World